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View Full Version : Changing Hapkido Schools Need Advice: Stick it out or Switch to another Art?



drewtoby
8/04/2013 9:45pm,
I am changing from a school that is similar to "combat hapkido". At this school we practiced only a few hundred moves at most, but emphasized perfecting our moves. All of the students there (myself included) took a few moves and made them become second nature to ourselves. We repeated a lot of the same stuff every class, and also added "light contact" sparring to the mix.

But, I quit. And lets just say I refuse to let several years of training go down the drain from a teacher that does not follow his own tenets.

However, the new school is completely opposite: a member of a well-known Hapkido Federation. After a month I have not seen a move repeated yet. The curriculum includes some useful moves, but also some moves I would not attempt in real life. We have more board breaks, forms, striking, and weapons. Due to the switch I would go back a couple belts too if I choose to stay. But, the instructor is helpful and works with me. Oh, and he is actually nice =)

Or, should I take up a different martial art instead? If so, what? I am a tall runner with long legs, so TKD might be good. Oh, and there is a Kung Fu school literally in my own back yard, although the art looks impractical in real life. I want to stick with traditional martial arts that I could apply my current knowledge too.

OwlMatt
8/04/2013 9:56pm,
What are you looking for out of your training? Is the club you're at providing you with what you want? If it is, then there's no reason to switch. If not, then what, specifically, is it not providing for you?

Dr_Awesome
8/06/2013 1:33pm,
Personally, I always thought the instructor and the school were way more important than the style. Now, of course, a good style is more likely to have a good instructor, but every style has bad teachers. I would make a list of at least 3 schools and visit them and watch a class or before you decide.

Nickosaurus
8/06/2013 2:26pm,
I am not a moderator so probably above my pay grade but why have you started another thread about switching style

http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=121505

To answer this latest thread - The name of the art is not so important it is the method of training. The judgement criteria to look for - Is this martial art trained with aliveness or is it in a dead patten, watch this video and you will understand the criteria


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imjmLWj5WCU

hungryjoe
8/06/2013 6:49pm,
I am not a moderator so probably above my pay grade but why have you started another thread about switching style

http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=121505

To answer this latest thread - The name of the art is not so important it is the method of training. The judgement criteria to look for - Is this martial art trained with aliveness or is it in a dead patten, watch this video and you will understand the criteria


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imjmLWj5WCU


^^^^^^^^this^^^^^^^^

Consider checking out a judo dojo. Most places offer a week for free and the cost is usually less than most schools, no matter what the style.

I walked away from Hapkido a couple of decades ago. While I still have good memories of the time and people, looking back, the training methodology was lacking. TKD is no different. Most 'karate' is the same.

Seriously, consider judo or another art that trains in an 'alive' manner.

Good luck.

jspeedy
8/06/2013 6:59pm,
Check out Filipino martial arts. I find them to be a happy medium for those who want a traditional training approach and practicality. If course FMA has its share bs and varies greatly due to the fact that there are hundreds of systems out there. OP where do you live? Perhaps some of us could recommend a place to train.

alex
8/06/2013 8:28pm,
biggest factor- list your goals.

drewtoby
8/10/2013 2:29pm,
I am not a moderator so probably above my pay grade but why have you started another thread about switching style

http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=121505

To answer this latest thread - The name of the art is not so important it is the method of training. The judgement criteria to look for - Is this martial art trained with aliveness or is it in a dead patten, watch this video and you will understand the criteria


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imjmLWj5WCU


Good catch. I am at the point in training where I need to decide if I will stick it out with Hapkido with the intent to cross train later on or move on to a more "alive" martial art. Oh, and I now know the term for my last school... Hankido. I would recommend a quick google search for the wiki page of Hankido for those that don't know what it is. As for the transfer, I have found the right school, just need to decide if I will stick with it or not.

As for what I want is to become better at self defense.

Zargor
8/10/2013 2:54pm,
Good catch. I am at the point in training where I need to decide if I will stick it out with Hapkido with the intent to cross train later on or move on to a more "alive" martial art. Oh, and I now know the term for my last school... Hankido. I would recommend a quick google search for the wiki page of Hankido for those that don't know what it is. As for the transfer, I have found the right school, just need to decide if I will stick with it or not.

As for what I want is to become better at self defense.

This stuff mate?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBj_MpxfURg

Totally reminds me of Aikido. Nice to watch, useless. You do realise that a semi-skilled swordsman would hack him to pieces before he could ever get close? The rest looks all alike, telegraphed and over commited attacks, uke following like zombies. Looks the same as for most of the Japanese TMA. Probably nice gymnastics, good for elasticity, that's all.

alex
8/10/2013 7:48pm,
As for what I want is to become better at self defense.

then why in other posts have you said you only want to study what you deem to be traditional martial arts? (i.e. stuff where you wear pyjamas and pay for meaningless belts)

you need to be honest here. if you want to learn how to throw down, go do judo and boxing or something. theres nothing wrong with being an asiaphile, but at least admit it.

drewtoby
8/10/2013 8:09pm,
This stuff mate?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBj_MpxfURg

Totally reminds me of Aikido. Nice to watch, useless. You do realise that a semi-skilled swordsman would hack him to pieces before he could ever get close? The rest looks all alike, telegraphed and over commited attacks, uke following like zombies. Looks the same as for most of the Japanese TMA. Probably nice gymnastics, good for elasticity, that's all.

No, mine was not like that and I am glad to say. Mine was like the one below. A lot of what we did was influenced by the book small circle jujitsu. That being said, we still stuck with some hapkido moves and kicks, but kept the repetition of Hankido. We also did many drills, so we were not static zombies.

http://www.youtube.com/embed/CVaUxv5BkI4

Alex: To be honest I don't want to get off the hapkido track just yet. Yes, I like the whole "traditional" system and I admit it: belts, foreign languages, ect are all cool. And I have had enough luck to have good instructors as well. I also want to learn the Hapkido forms and expand on what my Hankido class was missing. But that being said, I still believe Hapkido is a good art. What you put in is what you get out when your art covers a wide area of fighting, and at the moment I am putting a lot into it. I am mainly looking for future options. But with that being said, is Gongkwon Yusul a good cross training choice?