PDA

View Full Version : Help with training in my apartment



Pages : [1] 2

Corum Irsei
5/22/2013 11:06pm,
Now that I'm settled in with my evening schedule and pattern, I want to focus on my workout at home.

I bought an Everlast Heavy Bag stand ( http://www.amazon.com/Everlast-4812BDTC-Heavy-Bag-Stand/dp/B004HFLUK8/ref=pd_sxp_grid_pt_0_0 ) because the landlady doesn't allow modifications/drilling done to the walls. I considered using a Wavemaster, but feel that it would slide/move a lot. So, now that I have a punching bag stand, all that I need to buy is a bag.

What weight of bag would be good for me? I am 5'7" and 155lbs. Is there a science to selecting bag weights?

How much counterweights/plates do I need to buy? 1:1?

Does hitting a bag (punching and kicking practices) improve endurance on its own or do I still need to supplement it with running/cardio?

BackFistMonkey
5/22/2013 11:14pm,
The description says no more than a 100 lbs bag...

Have you researched your options and thought this through ?

jnp
5/23/2013 12:51am,
I sincerely hope you live on the ground floor. Otherwise, your neighbors will grow to not like you.

Corum Irsei
5/23/2013 3:49am,
The description says no more than a 100 lbs bag...

Have you researched your options and thought this through ?

I did. The numbers varied depending on the site and person that I visited/asked, but the most commonly purchased weights for those that are starting out range from 60-90lbs. Since I am just starting out, I feel that a limit of 100lbs is satisfactory both price-wise and experience-wise. There were other alternatives, but they covered a larger floor space, which I do not have the luxury of, due to the addition of another hook and beam at the opposite end.

Now, with those other non-stand alternatives, I couldn't find a wooden dummy or a padded dummy. The wavemaster was also a bad idea on paper because apart from the fact that I would need sand to fill it (to minimize displacement), it not only would slide more, but seems more fragile compared to a metal bag stand. Also, I am stuck with whatever bag that is attached to it, whereas with a stand, I could change the bag weight and length.


I sincerely hope you live on the ground floor. Otherwise, your neighbors will grow to not like you.

Really that bad?

3rd floor. The room below me is the maintenance and supply room. Landlady said that it was ok (and I let her sign a letter saying such), so I guess I am in the clear.

Devil
5/23/2013 8:44am,
I did. The numbers varied depending on the site and person that I visited/asked, but the most commonly purchased weights for those that are starting out range from 60-90lbs. Since I am just starting out, I feel that a limit of 100lbs is satisfactory both price-wise and experience-wise. There were other alternatives, but they covered a larger floor space, which I do not have the luxury of, due to the addition of another hook and beam at the opposite end.

Now, with those other non-stand alternatives, I couldn't find a wooden dummy or a padded dummy. The wavemaster was also a bad idea on paper because apart from the fact that I would need sand to fill it (to minimize displacement), it not only would slide more, but seems more fragile compared to a metal bag stand. Also, I am stuck with whatever bag that is attached to it, whereas with a stand, I could change the bag weight and length.



Really that bad?

3rd floor. The room below me is the maintenance and supply room. Landlady said that it was ok (and I let her sign a letter saying such), so I guess I am in the clear.


You are going to **** something up. Say goodbye to your security deposit.

Earl Weiss
5/23/2013 9:18am,
Back in the olden days we always took great pride in using heavier bags 90-100lbs+. After decades of kicking them the joints started to rebel and suffer wear and tear. Then I read in one of he Il Cho's books that he reccomended 60lbs max saying it was enough to test and develop power and not be too punishing on the body.

Now, there may need to be some allowance for the weight of the practitioner. A 160lb person could probably do with a lighter bag than a 260lb person.

Diesel_tke
5/23/2013 9:41am,
I've got a stand kind of like that one. Good luck not kicking the support bars when you kick the bag! I did it a few times, until I finally started zoning off to the left before I kick. Which is fine too. The main problem I have with this set up is that you can't work on footwork very well. But you gotta do what you gotta do. I have a 110lb Grant bag, I weight about 235lbs. Actually I have a few bags, but that's the one I use. The 70lb bag is ok, but swings too much for my licking. I had a 50lbs bag which may as well be a freaking balloon for all the flying it did.

I personally would go as heavy as you can stand. It will be good conditioning for your shins and hands. Are you doing Thai kicks(shin) or TKD kicks(feet)? If shins, heavy is better.

The other thing is what you want to do with it. If you are wanting to practice uppercuts, they have bags for that. Low kicks, bags for that. Leather, senthetic, canvas are all to be considered. They also have some crazy water bags. So make sure you know what you are looking for. Canvas bags eat up your hands if you punch them without wraps or gloves. They also settle realy bad so you will have to take it off the hanger to let the stuffing go back to the top.

Lot's of stuff out there. You can usually find one cheep on craig's list because people buy bags all the time, then realize that they actually have to use them to get any benefit from them. Then sell them because they use them for two weeks then quit.

svt2026
5/24/2013 9:57am,
I've got a stand kind of like that one. Good luck not kicking the support bars when you kick the bag! I did it a few times, until I finally started zoning off to the left before I kick. Which is fine too. The main problem I have with this set up is that you can't work on footwork very well. But you gotta do what you gotta do. I have a 110lb Grant bag, I weight about 235lbs. Actually I have a few bags, but that's the one I use. The 70lb bag is ok, but swings too much for my licking. I had a 50lbs bag which may as well be a freaking balloon for all the flying it did.

I personally would go as heavy as you can stand. It will be good conditioning for your shins and hands. Are you doing Thai kicks(shin) or TKD kicks(feet)? If shins, heavy is better.

The other thing is what you want to do with it. If you are wanting to practice uppercuts, they have bags for that. Low kicks, bags for that. Leather, senthetic, canvas are all to be considered. They also have some crazy water bags. So make sure you know what you are looking for. Canvas bags eat up your hands if you punch them without wraps or gloves. They also settle realy bad so you will have to take it off the hanger to let the stuffing go back to the top.

Lot's of stuff out there. You can usually find one cheep on craig's list because people buy bags all the time, then realize that they actually have to use them to get any benefit from them. Then sell them because they use them for two weeks then quit.

What he said is about everything you need to know. With the stand you will have limited movement for sure. I save on buying weights to keep the stand down and used sandbags. You will definitely make a lot of noise the stand will bound and move no matter how much weights you put on it. Also its loud to your neighbors next you you, I have mine in the basement and my wife complains its sounds like the walls are falling down.

jedtex88
5/27/2013 4:47am,
This sounds like the beginning of a DIY article on drywall. If you put the stand anywhere near the wall always make sure it's not too close to it before you start practicing. Is it too late to return it and get a wave master to put in the middle of the the room? They don't slide too much with 300 lbs. of sand in the base.

Corum Irsei
6/08/2013 12:40am,
Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, I am unable to return it. The good news is that there was space in the corner beside the bathroom as opposed to the wall separating me from the neighbor. Did reckless pounding on it for a minute just to test if the neighbors would hear/feel anything and fortunately they didn't. My brother also didn't feel anything from the hallway outside. I bought an 80-lb bag since it feels like a good number in between what diesel and earl said.

Still planning out my daily routine with the bag, because so far I feel that I am just doing random drills without a set system.

erezb
6/08/2013 6:35am,
You can find on youtube some nice stuff. bag workouts etc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmgHY6rk0QE
Just be careful not to injure yourself, you can easily break something if punching incorrectly. Wear wrist wraps! correctly (
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYrybP5FZqQ). Use a lot of head movement and as much foot work as you can in your situation. Imagine the bag is an opponent all the time, it will help you keep your hands up, use faints, bloks etc. It is a fight.
You need a stop watch, and train in rounds. If you are not fit, start with two minute rounds with 1 minute rest. Progress to 3 minutes rounds, and try and reach 10 rounds at least.
If you are already fit enough, u can make a "regular" round much harder by adding 20 sec "sprints" to your regular boxing routine, the sprint can be a continues 1,2 as fast and hard as you can, or focusing on any other combo you want, just repeating it as fast and hard as you can for 20 secs and than continuing boxing regularly. If you can get 1-3 of those per round for a few rounds, it will seriously make it harder. Those intervals can also be push ups, or burpees etc.
Another real hard routine is to box for three minutes and instead of resting for one, you do pushups and squats etc. (For me it is too much).
If you are working the bag for cardio and such, switch stances every other round to get a 50/50 symmetrical work out.
You do need another exercise routine for a great cardio, and i recommend running at least once a week to supplement bag workout. You can even do both at the same time, starting with a 15 minutes jog as a warmup, and than a 10 rounder..for a good solid cardio workout. (forgot to mention jump rope..)

I assumed you have basic technique, that you can punch and kick correctly and that is why you chose a heavy bag to put in your room. If not, you need to learn how to punch correctly before using said bag...

If you have more questions, feel free to ask.

Corum Irsei
6/11/2013 3:11am,
Thanks! By the way, will these work the same way as a wrist wrap?

http://www.lp-support.com/product/

Under Body Protection -> Wrist

or this
http://www.amazon.com/Harbinger-Training-WristWrap-Glove-XX-Large/dp/B00074H5P2/ref=sr_1_3?s=exercise-and-fitness&ie=UTF8&qid=1370938165&sr=1-3

I know the wraps are simpler, but for laziness and convenience's sake, I was wondering if I could save time and money by getting something that is reusable and easy to setup.

erezb
6/11/2013 4:50am,
you need support for your wrist and hand, what ever you use it should prevent your fist from bending more than about 30-40 degrees. It should also support the metacarpals.
It could definitely work, though probably not as good as wrist wraps. (After 5-7 times of use u would put them quickly..).
If the bag is heavy, and you use it for many rounds, and often, do yourself a favor and invest a few bucks in good hand wraps.

Corum Irsei
7/05/2013 7:07am,
Is that youtube link showing how to punch hard and fast still around? Can't seem to find it. Basically, it's a bald guy showing how to end the fight with a punch and that he has never done it on a live opponent because he might break something. The method is somewhat like throwing your elbow but converting it into a punch at the last minute. I think he was using a wavemaster. Memory is vague.

Anyway, want to incorporate it into my workout as well, because my straight punch is still slow for my taste.

Corum Irsei
7/05/2013 8:05am,
Nevermind. I found it. Tried Google this time and kept adding words until something came up.

Ron Lipton Demonstrations.

jedtex88
7/05/2013 8:34am,
Dude. That's just a reverse punch from a good guard. He's finishes it in a front stance Doesn't your Taekwondo instructor teach you to do that?